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  • 03/08/2021 7:00 PM | Rosemary Okoiti (Administrator)


    1. What three words describe you?

    Honest/Integrity, passionate, focused.

    2. What is/was your volunteer role?

    I was on the Board Nomination Committee in 2020 – the Committee’s role was to interview potential board members. I am continuing in this role in 2021.

    3. What do you/did you love about volunteering for ATD NYC? How has the experience changed you?

    I have really enjoyed getting more involved in the processes of the NYC Chapter.  I have been really impressed with the team that I have been lucky enough to interact with at ATD NYC chapter.  How it has changed me is that I need to commit to increase my involvement in 2021.  

    4. What career development opportunities are you exploring in the next one year?

    I am looking into some facilitation and virtual training certifications to start with in 2021.

     5. What advice would you give to a Chapter member who is considering volunteering today? 

    Do not hesitate to get involved at a deeper level.  There is not a downside, you have the opportunity to learn, engage with like minded professionals and build relationships that will remain a positive influence on you.

    6. What is the best way to get in touch with you and/or your social media links, website, email address?

    Reach out anytime via LinkedIn at linkedin.com/in/dvc40 or email me at: dvcnycsef@gmail.com.

     


  • 03/08/2021 10:55 AM | Adil Ibrahim (Administrator)


    By: Jessalin Lam, President Elect, ATD NYC, jessalin.lam@atdnyc.org   

    ATD NYC is committed to supporting talent development leaders and providing resources for your diversity, equity and inclusion efforts. You are all leaders who can make a difference for the people in your organization, and I encourage you to rise up to truly support your Asian employees to let them know their pain is not invisible.

    “The violence will only end when the silence ends.” -Michelle Lee

    In the last year, Stop AAPI Hate recorded 2800+ hate incidents against Asian Americans nationwide, including events of physical assault, barring Asians from establishments, and verbal harassment.1 It is disheartening that hate crimes in NYC against Asians have increased by 1900% in the last year and it has been an unsettling start of the year.2 President Biden recently signed an executive order condemning anti-Asian racism related to COVID-19. This post will share actionable ways for organizations to create a safe work environment to support your Asian employees.

    1.  Acknowledge the Anti-Asian Violence

    There cannot be silence to the violence against the Asian community. If your leadership team has not done so, work with HR and ERGs to send a note to all of your employees to act in solidarity with the AAPI community and acknowledge what is happening to act against xenophobia and hate.3 This kind of commitment will make employees feel safe to thrive and be seen. You can see examples including:

          Airbnb Fighting Anti-Asian Discrimination

          Twitter’s Allyship #StandForAsians

          Paul Knopp, CEO of KPMG US

          Suzy An, Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, Porter Novelli

          Dan Schulman, President & CEO, Paypal

     

    2.  Offer Resources and Educate Your Organization

    We are happy to share resources to help you educate your organization. Some examples of anti-Asian violence resources include:

          Education

          Anti-Apa History

          Humans Rights Watch: COVID AAPI Racism

          The Fight Against Anti-Asian American Violence

          Scapegoating Asian Citizens

          Hate Crimes Against Asian Americans are Nothing New

          Mental Health

          Support Employees Mental Health

          Asian Mental Health Collective Therapist Directory

          National Asian American Pacific Islander Mental Health Association

          Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA)

          Allyship & Bystander Intervention

          National Association of Asian American Professionals Building Allyship

          Guide to Bystander Intervention

          Bystander Intervention Training

          Petitions to Sign

          Get Mainstream Coverage of AAPI Assaults

          Become an Ally - Stop Discriminasian

     

    3.  Continue to Support Asian Employees on an Ongoing Basis

    Do not check it off your list to think after you send out a statement and resources that you are done with your work as a leader. Make sure you continue to commit to the long-term anti-racism commitment to invest in the growth and support of your Asian employees. As Richard Leong, DEI Consultant reminds us to ask, “Do Asian employees feel seen and presented in the company’s leadership?” and “Are their stories told as part of the company narrative?”3 Consider the professional growth of your Asians to leadership positions and make sure they are selected for professional development. For example, you could hire executive coaches for your AAPI employees, share the opportunity for Asian employees to apply for the BIPOC Scholarship to receive access to Strong Training and Coaching’s Manager Essentials Course or companies like PwC pay the membership for their AAPI employees to join Ascend, the largest, non-profit Pan-Asian organization for business professionals in North America. As Joyce Chiao, Founder of Inclusion Labs reminds leaders to consider promotion and compensation of API employees: “Are API employees paid equitable across racial demographics and role band? Are API employees promoted at the same rates within your organization?” Take the time to identify what works best to start with and know that this is a long-term commitment as a marathon, not a sprint for creating anti-racism solutions to support Asian employees.

    4.  Amplify Asian Voices to Be Shared

    This is an opportunity for leaders to step up and check in with your Asian employees to create a safe space for them. Be empathetic to ask them if they feel comfortable sharing their experience and listen to what they’re sharing with you instead of wanting to respond with your own story. For those employees who are open to the idea of sharing their perspective more widely to the organizations, amplify their voices to be heard and seen. For example, Eric Toda, Facebook leader shared his personal experience with AdWeek about how hateful, painful memories return. Consider their overall employee experience to ensure they feel safe and belong by actively listening to their lived experiences.

     

    5.  Share Asian Leaders and Resources

    As Benjamin Franklin once said, “An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest.” It is critical to keep learning and sharing anti-racism resources with your employees. Here are some Asian leaders, organizations, and resources we recommend you to follow to get you started:

          Leaders

          Amanda Nguyen

          Alice Wong

          Carissa Begonia

          Jerry Won

          Kay Fabella

          Michelle Kim

          Richard Leong

          Tiffany Yu

          William Yu

          Resources / Organizations

          AAPI Women Lead

          Anti-Racism Daily

          Asian Americans Advancing Justice

          Dear Asian Americans

          Gold House

          Hear Us Roar

          Museum of Chinese in America

          NextShark

          Smithsonian APA Center

    6.  Create Mentorship Programs

    There are various opportunities you can create as a talent development leader to continue to support employees and their growth. Mentorship is a valuable relationship to help your employees reach their full potential to support their personal and professional development while enhancing leadership and coaching skills. Consider creating a mentorship program and making sure your Asian employees can join to benefit from it as a mentor or mentee. For those who may not have the capacity to create an internal mentorship program, many organizations offer these resources to leaders across industries. For example, the 3AF Next Gen Leaders recently launched this year specifically designed to help rising leaders in the Asian American Pacific Islanders in the marketing, advertising, and creative industry or Women Who Create offers a mentorship program that connects young women of color in the creative industry.

     

    7.  Leverage Employee Resource Group

    You do not want your Asian employees to feel a lack of belonging or access to opportunity in the workplace. This is why we encourage you to leverage or create an employee resource group for them to have a community. As shared by Aaron Fung shared in “Set Your Employee Resource Groups Up for Success”, you will need to identify your why, build your coalition, execute, review and refine. xenophobia and hate.1 Some of the benefits of the ERG include the ability for employees to have a community among other employees to share experiences, identities, interests, along with increased employee retention and leadership opportunities.


    8.  Match Donations Supporting Asian Communities

    For companies that offer matching to non-profit organizations, you can consider Asian nonprofits to donate to or encourage employees to support Asian communities by sharing the list of resources to increase awareness. Some organizations to support include AAPI Women Lead, Asian Americans Advancing Justice, Stop AAPI Hate, Hate is a Virus, and Send Chinatown Love.

    Additional Sources

    1. What API ERGs Can Do in the Wake of Anti-API Violence
    2. Influencer Tina Craig Has An Important Message About Racist Attacks On Asian Americans
    3. How Managers Can Support Their Asian Peers Through the Troubling Increase in Anti-Asian Violence
    4. Anti-Asian Violence Resources
    5. 45 Ways to Donate in Support of Asian Communities
    6. On Anti-Asian Hate Crimes: Who Is Our Real Enemy?


  • 02/08/2021 3:54 PM | Rosemary Okoiti (Administrator)


    1. What three words describe you and why?

    Enthusiastic, strategic, and collaborative.

    I love taking on new challenges, especially when I get to learn something new. I am always the person that asks "Is this in alignment with our goals for this project?" and "How will this affect the XYZ team?" to make sure we understand the big picture and are using our time wisely. 

    2. What is/was your volunteer role?

    I am currently the Assistant Vice President of Special Interest Groups (SIGs). I was on the Board Nomination Committee in 2020.

    3. What do you/did you love about volunteering for ATD NYC? How has the experience changed you?

    The Nomination Committee was a great introduction to ATD NYC. I learned a lot about areas of ATD I had yet to explore and it gave me a behind the scenes look at what our board members do. This process has made me even more enthusiastic about contributing to the wonderful things that ATD NYC does for its members.

    4. What career development opportunities are you exploring in the next one year?

    I am fairly new in my Talent Development career and so I am reading books and taking classes on areas I wish to explore further. This includes things like data analytics, performance, and talent strategy.

     5. What advice would you give to a Chapter member who is considering volunteering today? 

    Just ask. And keep asking. There are many opportunities. It is just a matter of putting yourself out there.

    6. What is the best way to get in touch with you and/or your social media links, website, email address?

    Feel free to reach out to me at Karilynnrussell@gmail.com or connect with me on LinkedIn at www.LinkedIn.com/in/karilynnrussell


  • 01/12/2021 6:29 PM | Rosemary Okoiti (Administrator)


    1. What three words describe you and why?

    Optimistic, sociable and innovative. I live for the moment, enjoy working as part of a team and thrive in exciting and dynamic environments. I enjoy generating ideas for new projects but can be guilty of neglecting to think through the finer details.

    2. What is/was your volunteer role?

    My role this year is President of the Chapter, following my stint as VP of Operations last year. I’m excited to work more closely with all of the Chapter VPs including finance, marketing, programs, SIGs, tech, talent management and membership. I hope to further my knowledge in the various areas that make ATDNYC a success and contribute to the ongoing development of the Chapter. 

    3. What do you/did you love about volunteering for ATD NYC? How has the experience changed you?

    I moved to NYC in Dec ’17 and have enjoyed being part of the local Talent Development community. I love working on the board with a team from all different professional backgrounds. It’s great to have a network in NYC I can support and fall back on - it’s like an extended family!

    4. What career development opportunities are you exploring in the next one year?

    Last November I took on a new role as Head of Global Learning and Development for Allianz Global Corporate and Specialty, where I have responsibility for designing learning and talent strategies, with a focus on strategic capability building to meet the future needs of the insurance industry. I lead a team of 11 learning and talent managers, serving 4,000+ employees, in 30+ countries around the globe

    5. What advice would you give to a Chapter member who is considering volunteering today? 

    ‘The best way to get involved is to jump in the deep end! You can contribute as much or as little as you like, depending on your time available. Volunteering is a great way to network, build your knowledge and contribute to your local TD community.

    6. What is the best way to get in touch with you and/or your social media links, website, email address?

    You can reach me at lindsay.fletcher@atdnyc.org or connect with me on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lindsay-fletcher/


  • 12/29/2020 7:43 PM | Gregory Simpson (Administrator)

    We are saddened to learn of the passing this year of Linda Sayre, 1994 President

    Linda Sayre was an extraordinary woman whose significant talents were put to full use when she took over chapter leadership.  She became president of the chapter at a critical juncture – corporations had stopped paying membership dues and ATD membership dropped considerably. Linda engineered the restructuring of the financial base and member services, downsizing the outside vendor who provided administration services. She also consolidated the leadership structure to eliminate an unworkable decision-making process and created in its place a way to honor senior level professionals on an advisory council. It was a masterful move. 

    Linda brought a fresh perspective and new ideas to the chapter. She created the role VP of Community Outreach and spearheaded partnerships with HSBC, LYNX (a black women’s bankers group), Time Warner Cable, and the New York City Department of Employment to develop programs to give minority young people exposure to corporate life.  She presented this model at the national ATD conference. She continued to be involved in the chapter, most recently on the ATD NYC Nominating Committee.

    Linda held senior human resource positions in the public and private sector and was an adjunct instructor; she loved teaching and motivating adult students to successfully apply learning to their careers, and in other areas in their lives.  She was well traveled and spent her junior year of high school studying in Switzerland.  Her doctorate in Adult and Continuing Education was from Rutgers, and her two master’s degrees were from Columbia University and the University of Sussex in the UK.

    Recollection by Margaret Maat, 1995 President:

    Linda Sayre was one of the most remarkable women I ever met. She had the ability to discern instinctually how to make leadership decisions that would benefit the health of the organization. She saw issues related to leading people clearly, no rose-colored glasses. 

    Her wit and candor were refreshing. She could have you in stitches one moment and wowed in the next with some story of human foible. She was well read and always prepared. She was also vulnerable, no armor on her soul. What you saw was what you got. 

    She endured much with grace and fortitude. What a treasure. 

    Recollection by Jay Colan, 1993 President:

    Linda had a great sense of history and culture and a love of New York City. She is remembered for her spirit of life, her wit, and her willingness and drive to do things differently that will have practical benefits.  We will miss her.   


    Special thanks to Anne Lesch, Margaret Maat, and Jay Colan for notifying the chapter and for providing this tribute.

  • 12/28/2020 6:19 AM | Gregory Simpson (Administrator)

    Producing and distributing an annual report is included as part of the Chapter Affiliation Requirements (CARE) for ATD National. To be 100 percent CARE achieved, chapters must produce and share with members an annual report that includes, but is not limited to, information about membership numbers, financial performance, and progress toward annual goals.

    By sharing our annual report, our members can better understand how the chapter uses membership dues to maintain chapter operations and support its local talent development professionals.

    The 2020 ATD NYC Board of Directors presented its 2020 Annual Report on December 16, 2020 as part of our Annual Event/Holiday Party.  This year's report was presented virtually due to the pandemic.

    Click here to read the ATD NYC 2020 Annual Report.


  • 12/13/2020 12:40 PM | Rosemary Okoiti (Administrator)


    1. What three words describe you and why?

    PROFESSONAL: I believe that we must adopt high professional standards for how we work with the people we are training and supporting--standards of performance that go beyond satisfying our bosses or the progress of our careers. Professional organizations, such as ATD, play a key role in maintaining those standards. 

    INNOVATIVE: Throughout my years in this field, I have continually explored how new, innovative technologies can fundamentally change our approach to employee performance- -not just how they can help manage or deliver the same old inefficient training models. My particular focus--Performance Support--is all about new approaches. 

    TENACIOUS: The concepts and technologies of Performance Support were first articulated, and their benefits clearly demonstrated by me and others, over 30 years ago. But, they have yet to take their place among the approaches generally applied in our L&D/TD world. Yet I keep on pushing. 

    2. What is/was your volunteer role?

    I am currently co-chair of the chapter's Performance Support SIG. We explore ways to enable effective employee performance that go far beyond what traditional training courses can deliver. I am also leading a small Community of Practice group to provide support tools and workflow learning to help SIG leaders register their events into the chapter's database application.

    3. What do you/did you love about volunteering for ATD NYC? How has the experience changed you?

    I enjoy working with professionals who want to improve the way they enable their organization's employees. And I continually learn from the experiences of other professionals. BTW: This is my second time through this, having run an ASTD SIG 30 years ago. 

    4. What career development opportunities are you exploring in the next one year?

    As companies re-open from their shutdowns, they will need new ways to handle all the learning and relearning that the New Normal will demand. All employees will be, in one way or another, "novices." Training courses will not be able to meet that need. I'm exploring more effective and efficient alternatives. 

    5. What advice would you give to a Chapter member who is considering volunteering today? 

    It is well worth the time you put into it. And the chapter needs your help if it is going to provide the services it is dedicated to providing. 

    6. What is the best way to get in touch with you and/or your social media links, website, email address?

    The easiest way is to just drop me an email at: halchris@quick-competence.com

  • 11/23/2020 5:45 PM | Rosemary Okoiti (Administrator)


    1. What three words describe you?

            Learner, risk-taker, problem solver
     

    2. What is/was your volunteer role?

         Vice President of Finance

    3. What do you/did you love about volunteering for ATD NYC? How has the experience changed you?

    As an occupational safety professional, my past and other current volunteer involvement has been and is working with people with backgrounds and experience similar to mine and with ATD, this was definitely not the case. I have had the opportunity to volunteer, connect and learn from people with different backgrounds and this has been a very enriching experience.

    4. What career development opportunities are you exploring in the next one year?

    I am in the final stages of the Level 3 gamification certification through Sententia that I have been working towards after attending a Level 1 class offered by ATD NYC. I also hope to learn Articulate or similar program this year.

    5. What advice would you give to a Chapter member who is considering volunteering today? 

    Volunteer opportunities vary in duration from a couple of hours to 1 year commitments so try something out, you might be interested in and you may find out that you really enjoy it (or not).

    6. What is the best way to get in touch with you and/or your social media links, website, email address?

    Linda@safetyfundamentals.com
    www.SafetyFUNdamentals.com
    Linkedin.com/LindaTapp
    Facebook.com/SafetyFUNdamentals
    Twitter @
    SafetyFUN
    Instagram @
    safetyfundamentals

  • 10/19/2020 5:41 PM | Rosemary Okoiti (Administrator)

    1. What three words describe you and why?

    Spontaneous, adventurous and eccentric. 

    have been called spontaneous and adventurous quite a few times - since I get bored easily, I try to keep myself on my toes by changing things up and trying new ways of doing things. And constantly asking, being a constant "questioner" (using Happiness expert, Gretchen Rubin's, language) on why things need to be done a certain way, some may find my experimental ways to be strange or eccentric. 

    2. What is/was your volunteer role?

    VP of Programs. In a nutshell, I help with the programming that happens for the chapter. This is primarily the monthly chapter events that take place for our members. With COVID changing the world and moving us to virtual, we are looking at additional programming such as a podcast/video series with luminaries and experts from a variety of fields, because innovation happens at the intersection of disciplines! 

    3. What do you/did you love about volunteering for ATD NYC? How has the experience changed you?

    I love that I gain exposure to such a vast population of talent development professionals. As a volunteer, especially in my role, I have had the privilege to offer guidance, advice, and insights to over a dozen individuals new in this field and I have realized I should have started volunteering like this earlier in my career so I could have shared my perspectives with even more people. It's never too late, though! Also, the more I share what I know, the more I learn about what I don't know. 

    4. What career development opportunities are you exploring in the next one year?

    This is the first year of my new company, Copilot Strategy, which is focused on helping L&D teams be more effective. With that said, this year I will be focusing on improving my sales, marketing, and advertising skills. A big part of consulting is to be able to acquire new business leads, so that will be a completely new territory for me in the coming year. 

    5. What advice would you give to a Chapter member who is considering volunteering today? 

    Do it. Quite simply, don't hesitate to give of yourself and your time (of course, after understanding the time committment, and making sure you aren't spreading yourself too thin!). I would advise any new volunteer to remember to utilize (a) the volunteer network of ATD-NYC to get things done, and (b) to leverage the other board members for help whenever needed. 

    6. What is the best way to get in touch with you and/or your social media links, website, email address?

    Email: adil.ibrahim@atdnyc.org ; LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/adilibrahim; Website: www.CopilotStrategy.com

    Twitter: @adilibrahim  

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Telephone: 212-479-7397
Email: contact@atdnyc.org

Chapter Incentive Program (ChIP) code for td.org store purchases: CH1026

Address:
ATD New York City Chapter
105 W 86th St #347
New York, NY  10024-3444

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